Keep Maine Beautiful Rock

Officially called the Pockwockamus Rock and before the entrance of Baxter State Park.

East Branch Sno Rovers Clubhouse and headed west towards NEOC and on to 85/86 to Abol Bridge. Abol Bridge spans the Penobscot River and offers incredible views of Katahdin. Both Abol Bridge Campground and Store and the Big Moose Inn close for the winter but it’s still a great spot for snowmobilers to take in some amazing views of Katahdin.

Continue west until you see the ‘Keep Maine Beautiful’ Rock on your right.

Loring Air Force Base

If coming from caribou take 89 off the railroad bed. Stay on 89 you will come to a intersection you will see a big yellow sign says Bunker Inn on the top of the sign (can’t miss it, ha ha). Take that left, there that’s it your on the base

Club trail 100A and 81A will get you to Loring

100 A will take you around the outside of the base

100B will take you down the runway loop around the arch hanger and what not

A little bit of history from wiki can be found here

Eagle Lake Trains

Abandoned Eagle Lake Trains

The Eagle Lake and West Branch Railroad operated the two large engines from 1927-1933. On an average week, the engines and their 12 cars hauled more than 6,500 cords of pulpwood along the tracks to the West Branch watershed. The railroad was the brainchild of Edouard “King” LaCroix and brought wood for the paper-making industry from the region surrounding Eagle and Churchill Lakes over to Umbazooksus Lake, owned by Great Northern Paper. The steam locomotives and their tenders (name of the car that carried the fuel) were originally built in 1897 and 1901. LaCroix purchased them used (thrifty, thrifty!) before moving them to Maine. Once in Maine’s deep woods, they were converted from coal to oil to avoid forest fires caused by coal’s cinders.

History of the Eagle Lake Trains

Great Northern Paper Co trains operated from 1927-1933.

When the operations ended in 1933, both trains were pretty obsolete and it wasn’t worth the money to move them. They were retired to a shed at Eagle Lake. When the shed burned down in 1966, the trains were exposed to the elements and visitors. A few vandals, too, unfortunately. To prevent them from completely rusting away, the Maine Parks and Recreation Commission painted the trains in 1969. As you make your way through the woods to the two engines, keep your eyes peeled for remnants of the 1,500-foot trestle, which carried both the train and its heavy cargo across the north end of Chamberlain Lake where Allagash Stream enters the lake.

Snowmobile Touring Directions to the Trains

FROM ROCKWOOD-KINEO, MAINE:

Take the Moosehead Loop/Rt 66 Re-route to the Ragged Lake Trail. Head East 4.3 miles. Head north on the Maxfield Brook Trail. Cross over the Golden Road and head north on the Pine Stream Trail 14 miles to Chesuncook Village and the Chesuncook Lake House. Stop at the Lake House to fuel up and get the very latest trail instructions to avoid cutting operations in the area. The trains are 21 miles from the Lake House.

FROM GREENVILLE, MAINE:

Run up Moosehead Lake to Kineo or take the trail to Kokadjo. At Kokadjo take the Moosehead Loop/Rt66 Re-route to the Ragged Lake Trail. Head East 4.3 miles. Head north on the Maxfield Brook Trail. Cross over the Golden Road and head north on the Pine Stream Trail 14 miles to Chesuncook Village and the Chesuncook Lake House. Stop at the Lake House to fuel up and get the very latest trail instructions to avoid cutting operations in the area – but confirm they’re open first. The trains are 21 miles from the Lake House

  • Mileage to the Trains from:
    • Fort Kent 193
    • Eagle Lake 163
    • Portage Lake 120
    • Oxbow 78
    • Libby Camps 45
    • Washburn Trailrunners Clubhouse 130
    • Chesuncook Lake House 22
    • Millinocket 80
    • Pittston Farm 70
    • Jackman 112
    • Kokadjo 63

https://amsnow.com/reviews/snowmobile-trails-travel/2010/12/maines-forgotten-railroad

https://www.maine.gov/dacf/parks/discover_history_explore_nature/history/allagash/index.shtml

THANKS TO AMERICAN SNOWMOBILER, BANGOR NEWS & KEVIN BROWN & MAINE.GOV FOR THESE GREAT IMAGES. See their links above

A few good loops

A few nice trails up here are 120/92 Deboullie/St Francis,

92 Glazier Lake Loop,

73B Fort kent to Sinclair,

81A Grande Isle,

81 Van Buren to Limestone border trail,

90/89/102/100A Caribou to Limestone and onto the old Loring AFB.

All good trails!!

Newport to Greenville

Park n Ride in Newport, take the railbed north until you get to Greenville.

Directions to the Newport Four Seasons Adventure Trail parking lot: Take Interstate 95 Exit 157 in Newport and drive north on Route 7-Route 11 (also known as Moosehead Trail) for 1.2 miles and the large parking lot for the trail will be on your left, across the road from Varney Ford, which has the address of 237 Moosehead Trail. From the parking lot, Four Seasons Adventure Trail — heading north — starts across the road. Other snowmobile trails — heading south — are on the same side of the road as the parking lot.

Starting at Newport and heading north, the 29-mile Four Seasons Adventure Trail connects the communities of Newport, Corinna, Dexter, Sangerville and Dover-Foxcroft. A gravel, multiuse trail, the Four Seasons Adventure Trail is also open to cross-country skiers, dog sleds and snowshoers, and in the summer, the trail is used by ATV riders, runners, bicyclists, hikers and horseback riders.

It’s a leisurely ride from Newport up to Dover-Foxcroft to have lunch at the Bear’s Den [Restaurant & Tavern], and then back, maybe checking out a few side trails along the way. And it’s a comfortable ride from Newport up to Greenville to have lunch in Greenville and ride back.

Kelly’s landing is a favorite lunch spot in Greenville.

Dual Rider goes on our very first snowmobiling adventure. Dave, Mo, and I take to the trails around Moosehead Lake from Greenville to Mt. Kineo and back across the lake.